SE Asia through Ethiopia goggles

I’ve done a fair amount of research for my SE Asia trip. I’ve read the Lonely Planet Guidebook for each of the countries I’m traveling to, my boyfriend did the same and then we compared notes, we looked up activity prices, travel routes, hotels, and restaurant options. And all I could think was: Damn, everything looks so nice!

I was shocked, really. The hotels we looked up were all listed as budget options; they were cheaper than the place we stay when we come in to Addis. But they’re so much nicer! I focused on cheap and mid-range food – and there’s so much more variety! Shocked might actually be an understatement to my real reaction.

During my online research, I stumbled upon this blog – “It’s a Real City!”: Hanoi Through Cambodia Goggles – and I couldn’t stop laughing. The blogger was living in Phnom Penh, Cambodia and moved to Hanoi, Vietnam and couldn’t get over how developed it was. People would tell her everything that was still wrong with Hanoi and the only thought that came to her mind was “If you think this is underdeveloped, you should check out Cambodia!”

As for me, I’ve seen photo upon photo of Thailand, Vietnam, Cambodia, and Laos, and all I could think was: Damn, everything looks so nice! Clearly, after two years in Ethiopia, I’ve developed Ethiopia goggles. I’m viewing the world through a developing nation in East Africa. I’ve spent the last two years pretending a hole in the floor is a bathroom, thinking a cold shower is normal, living in an uninsulated/unheated/uncooled home, and eating the same food week after week – often with bugs in it. And you know what, I’ve gotten used to it.

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Camp GLOW 2014

Last year, on the first day of camp, I packed my students cold lunches. I introduced them to peanut butter and jelly sandwiches, chips, apple juice, complete with a banana. This year, with fewer students, I decided to give them something even more shocking: cheeseburgers. I took them to Tropical Burger and ordered us a few burgers to share (including a veggie burger for myself), and watched their eyes light up as they tried something new. Luckily, they loved it! And then it was off to Wondo Genet.

1 - Arrival

One of my sessions was Journal Making – and we quickly learned a little more about the campers. Sultan loves to draw and he sketched an image of Jasmine he found on one of the stickers, quite well if I might add. And Michael admitted he wanted to go to Peru of all places, so he drew a ship to sail away on. But my favourite journal cover by far combined America and Ethiopia:

2 - Obama

My next session was Reader’s Theater. This year, we used the Eager4English books I helped publish here and we had the campers act out stories from Yirgalem in SNNPR and Gimbi in Oromia. Even some of the shyer students began to come out of their shells.

3 - Reader's Theater

My final activity was the Camp Olympics, and much like last year, it worked out wonderfully, despite being left to the last minute haha We had a water balloon toss, obstacle course, tank & driver, water challenge, relay races, and puzzles & piggies.

4 - Relay Race

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Wondo Wilderness

Last week I was in Wondo Genet for our second Camp GLOW. And while I’ve officially gone through all 6,000 photos taken during that time period, it’s hard to decide which pictures of the campers to share.

So while I continue to sort through those, I figured I could at least show you what Wondo looks like and why we returned there for a second year of camp:

B&W Monkey

This guy greeted us almost immediately upon arrival. We have a lot of monkeys in Hawassa, but most aren’t this stunning.

Mountain

These mountains were our view every morning, noon, and night.

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Before it’s too late – a day with the hippos

My countdown began the day I set foot in Ethiopia, but the end is finally starting to feel real. Which made me realize – there are still things I haven’t done here.

You could live in one country your entire life and still not do everything there is to do. But after 26 months in Ethiopia, I want to be able to say I did everything I wanted to do.

Which is why Chandler and I got up on Sunday and after a late breakfast with some fellow Peace Corps and VSO volunteers, we met up with some friends of mine for a boat ride to see the hippos.

Now this trip isn’t exactly cheap when you’re getting paid in the local currency, but it’s something you can easily save up for. That’s my excuse as to why it didn’t happen during my first two years in Ethiopia: cost. But when a friend and her family were going and invited us along, I realized my chance had finally come.

After waiting for about half an hour down by the water, our boat arrived. My friend, her husband, their two kids, Chandler and I all pulled on our life jackets and hopped aboard. Another 15-20 minutes later and we had crossed Lake Hawassa and were in hippo territory.

I quickly realized going out to see the hippos can be a bit anti-climatic, because you only see the tops of their heads. But the scenery, as well as imagining their size beneath the water, was incredible.

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Saying Goodbyes

As weird as it was saying goodbye to teachers and students a few weeks ago, saying goodbye to my fellow Peace Corps Volunteers has been even more surreal. Especially knowing that I’ll go back to Hawassa on Thursday and I’ll still have another two months here.

Our Close of Service Conference took place May 25th-29th and about half of us are still in Addis for our Post-Peace Corps medical check-ups. The other half finished up before the conference. It’s hard to believe this is already happening. I’ve had so many trainings and vacations to look forward to and to count down to throughout my service, but this is it. I only have one countdown left: 65 days until I fly out of Ethiopia.

The Close of Service Conference was by far my favourite “training” we’ve done with Peace Corps. We discussed our reintegration fears: Will I find a job? How long will it take before I remember I can flush toilet paper? When will I realize there’s hot water…and it will NEVER run out? What if people think I’m weird? What if I think others are weird?

We also discussed different career paths open to Returned Peace Corps Volunteers (RPCVs)…and got to hear what others had in mind. It was also comforting to hear how many volunteers didn’t yet have plans. My boyfriend and I plan on spending about 3-4 months backpacking in SE Asia, but my life after I set foot on American soil is still a blank slate.

Instead of spending all our time in Addis, which is common for our PC trainings, our COS Conference included a trip to Lake Langano, and not one, but two resorts – though that was due to a scheduling error. We spent our days in sessions and having our final shay/buna (tea/coffee) breaks, and our evenings down at the lake basking in the glow of bonfires. Some goodbyes were harder than others, knowing this was the last time we’d see some of these people in Ethiopia.

I may have two months left, but one of my closest friends has already left Ethiopia, and another leaves next week. And while this is incredibly sad to me, it also makes leaving all the easier. If I stayed, everyone else would leave me behind. So I definitely feel ready to move on. But even with that in mind, I’ve never been good at goodbyes…

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A teacher no more…

Whew…after two years living and working in Ethiopia, my time as a teacher has finally come to a close! Yesterday marked the end of my Reading Program at Adare and we celebrated with an awards ceremony and cookies : )

Two students from each grade 7 & 8 class were named “Adare Star Readers” and were allowed to pick a chapter book – graciously donated by friends, family, and strangers – to bring home and continue their reading practice. Books chosen were classics like Matilda, The Magician’s Elephant, Bridge to Terabithia, and Peter Pan.

The joy on their faces was worth the struggle I sometimes went through keeping this program up and running over the last nine months. I just want to say thank you to everyone back home who helped support this program, the students will never forget it!

Adare Readers

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